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president of the united states, we will stop it. i will not cut our commitment to our military. >> the president once again blasted romney's hidden camera comments on the 47% of americans he dubbed victims of government dependence. >> i don't think we can get very far with leaders who writeoff half the nation as a bunch of victims who never take responsibility for their own lives. >> 47% of the people vote for the president no matter what. who -- >> the obama campaign turned romney's secretly recorded remarks into a devastating new ad claiming the gop nominee's words under the families and veterans. >> so my job is not to worry about -- they should take personal responsibility. >> romney two days in a row out to link national security to the nation's sluggish recovery. he's seizing on new economic data revising down the 2nd quarter gdp. >> this is not just one quarter. this has been going on now for years. china's growing much faster than we. russia's growing faster than we. our economy needs to be reinvigorated. >> but not all the numbers paint a gloomy picture. the labor depa
at this crisis? speak of the united state unites attacked september 11, 11 years ago, and united states attacked september 11 yesterday. what does that mean? the united states territories, the embassy, it was egypt and libya. were they coordinated attacks? when the president came out, as you rightly did, he should have followed that by saying these attacks are not going to be tolerated, we will hold the host governments responsible for this. some indication even in egypt there was advanced warning these attacks are coming which is why the americans had gotten out of that embassy. the president of the united states needs to say to those countries who will hold you responsible, have to protect our people, you have to have better protection of our people and if you don't do that we will reassess our relationship with you because if you don't stand strong right now, this is what happened to jimmy carter and why ronald reagan was elected. jimmy carter did not do something strong. he apologized, said let's try to negotiate and that is the kind of response i heard from president obama. dagen: did we ha
investment, which, in turn, would lower the growth of incomes in the united states. and so, while we talk about growing the economy and economic growth and the need to get businesses around this country hiring again, at the same time there is a negative pressure being place odd them because congress can't do its job to control spending. $16 trillion in debt. you mentioned it was nearly $51,000 for every man, woman and child. we have a 10-month-old, he owes $51,000 as a share of the federal debt. $51,000 a piece. and that negative pressure, that mounting debt, deficits that are over $1 trillion a year, makes it moran more difficult for businesses to have access to the capital they need to grow and make it difficult for companies to operate because they find themselves competing with the federal government for those scares resources. next thing, the government will have to look at tax increases. and so the challenges our bases face, congress, can you get government out of the way so we can let america work and run our businesses the way we want to, not the way washington wants to. but at th
've always expected people would get in the united states of america. that only comes from the private sector. that's where, i think, the romney approach, people will find to be the right one. >> this market has been rallying. of course, it seems to be working in obama's favor, even though it's probably has a lot more to do with the central bank and all of the easing out there than it does to the policies. is there any reason to believe that if this president is re-elected, then he moves to the center that, he does the policies that you're talking about that romney, of course, has been leading with? >> i think that's been my greatest disappointment, that we have not seen this government move more to a centerous approach to move the country forward. there were numerous opportunities to do that. i just don't think it aligns with where the president would like to take the country. there's one approach that says static pie, let's figure out how to split it up. that's the approach that's being taken. when they say we're all in this together, we're all in this together, but we're going to take from
in the united states. some indexes they watch on a weekly basis have been lower recently and that will fuel a lot of talk about a bit of a slowdown. front-running the fed, guys, did you see what happened yesterday? i pointed out some of the biggest etfs in the high yield area. i'm talking about j&k had heavy volume and hitting new highs. why is that happening? a lot of people believe at the minimum the fed is going to extend forward guidance to keep interest rates low to at least 2015. all of that would be a big beneficiary to high-yield funds who are forcing people to go out on the yield curve. this is one simple way people are already anticipating exactly what the fmoc is going to be doing. back to you. >> terrific, bob. got to ask rick. looks like people sell bond, shift bonds to the dollar. rick is at cm group in chicago. >> thank you. i guess we should welcome europe to the same club the u.s. is in. lots of liquidity. maybe more liquidity coming. and a generally weak economy. welcome to the club. if you look at our charts, they pretty much reflect a lot of what central banking is doing
, and the united states. look, we know that china used to be one of the world's great growth engines. it almost single handedly kept the global economy afloat during the global recession. but after playing the roe of the world's economic engine for so long, the chinese locomotive seems to be in danger of running off the rails. each piece of data is weaker than the last. so what's good about that? well, the slowdown in china seems somewhat self-inflicted. governments hit the brakes and in many ways still seems like it's happening. the hope is the chinese will start cutting rates, adding real octane to the down shift in their economy. how about europe? the european central bank meeting this week and we're expecting to hear some chatter in unison that's going to ereverse the declining economies over there and maybe unite to save the spanish banking system. you can monitor these efforts by watching the largest spanish bank which has been climbing ever since it bottomed at $4 and change. $7 stock finishing up 0.182%. that's positive. what changed or reversed this stock which i consider to be the mos
.s. prospers. to say manufacturing jobs in general are going to come back to the united states. most chinese products of low cost are going to go other places. they aren't coming back to the u.s. we have to recognize there's a dramatic ure ing in the world and everybody is part participating in it. >> we know the competitive situation always leans towards china because they've got much lower, you know, costs there. so companies are going to send workers to china and going to manufacture in china. what's great about china slowing down for the u.s.? >> i would agree with robert that, yes, there's a structural rebalancing going on. but this rebalancing is great because this enables for china's middle class to grow and create a service sector which can generate continued higher wages. that allows the private sectors in the developed economies to sell to china's middle class and not just depend on america's middle class. this way it gives a new engine of growth for nations around the world. and this is not priced into the markets. the markets have priced in the fact that china is slowing down but
to allow people all over the united states and some overseas locations to call at any time, day or night, and get help and they need it. finally, we want to make sure that suicide prevention is part of our broader efforts to improve health care across america. for example, a couple of weeks ago, the centers for medicare and medicaid services announced new standards that doctors will have to meet to earn certain incentive payments. we made sure that providing people who have major depression with suicide risk assessment was included as one of those standards. beginning last year, medicare also began covering an annual preventive screened for depression which is especially important since older americans have the highest rate of death by suicide. in the past, we have often treated mental health or substance abuse as personal issues. individuals must overcome these on their own or with their family and health care provider. by addressing these conditions, and recognizing they are just as important to our country as addressing any help issue whether it is childhood obesity, hypertension, or
of the united states. i've got a very effective campaign doing a very good job, but not everything i say is elegant and i want to make it very clear, i want to help 100% of the people. >> dave: he followed up by saying, you know, you didn't totally answer that question, but to romney's point. do you need a complete change of direction or turn around or campaign better and minimize mistake. comes down to debate. october 3rd the big first debate. >> and like that he addressed the 47%, hey, i wasn't an elegant speaker and i do want to help all americans. >> clayton: now more on that, and could it come down to foreign policy? we'll ask chris wallace about that coming up in a little bit. the number of able bodied americans on food stamps has doubled as president obama changed to welfare reform law. how can it be a fair and balanced debate. >> not so sweet 16. thousands of teenagers showing up and reuting in the streets. ahead. ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to free my soul ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to lose control ♪ ♪ where's the party (car horn) paying with your smartphone ins
day now. let's take the three big bad/good battlegrounds. china, europe, and the united states. look, we know that china used to be one of the world's great growth engines. it almost singlehandedly kept the global economy afloat during the global recession as the chinese communists figured out how to spur domestic spending. but after playing the role of the world's economic engine for so long, the chinese locomotive seems to be in danger of running off the rails. each piece of data is weaker than the last. so what's good about that? well, much of the slowdown in china seems somewhat self-inflicted. when the pure si realized it overstimulated the economy, governments hit the brakes and in many ways still seems like it's happening. the hope is that the chinese will stop stepping on the brake pedal but start cutting rates, adding real ago taken to the downshift in their economy. how about europe? the european central bank meeting this week and we're expecting to hear some chatter in unison that's going to reverse the declining economies over there and maybe unite to save the spanish ban
.c. too do -- to do that. since joining the united states senate in january of 2011, he has established himself as a constitutional conservative pledging to work every day to reform government and end business as usual here in our nation's capital. in fact, i'm proud to say that he has received a 100% score on the frc action scorecards for the 112th congress, voting to defund obama care and planned parenthood. [applause] he is a devoted father and husband. married to his wife, kelly, over 21 years. together they have the joy of raising three teenage boys, william, duncan, and robert. amidst a busy schedule, he regularly volunteers to coach their baseball, babble -- basketball teams. please join me from the great state of texas -- kentucky. well, his dad is from texas. and they bonet both stand for protecting the constitution of which i am extremely grateful. please welcome senator rand paul! [cheers and applause] ♪ >> can you believe the democrats had trouble getting god into the platform? sounds like there wasn't much dissension from this group. she said she wanted $100. she wrote a
. >>> the drenching that parts of the united states got last week, including tornadoes out in queens, not really helping parched farmland. there are no farms in queens, are there? this afternoon we're going to get exclusive details on the economic impact from our senior economics reporter steve leisman. he's here live. >> in about three minutes we're going to get an e-mail from the guy that runs the farm in queens. it is a big impact from what's a small sector of the economy and it could even have an impact on the presidential election. in a detailed study of the summer's drought which scored soybeans, corn and other crops across the nation, macro economic advisors out of st. louis estimate it could shave as much as a half point off gross domestic product this year. that's a big hit to a $13 trillion economy from a total farm sector that accounts for just -- wait for it now -- 1% of the nation's output. ben herzon is the economist who did the study. pe explai he explains the drought's outside impact. >> even though it only accounts for 1% of the economy, big changes in farm output can show up in
able to read that the united states is not as prepared as it should be for this type of cyber attack. >> we're not anywhere where we need to be in terms of a country with respect to preparedness and ultimately in response. the head of cyber command, general keith alexander, i think put it best when asked to evaluate one to ten where the u.s. capability is. he put it at a three. obviously this is not a very good position to be in, especially when you have a number of actors out there. china and russia are very active in terms of computer network exploit. that's espionage in cyberspace. they're increasingly integrating cyber warfare into their military planning and war fighting capabilities. these are all issues we need to take very seriously and we need to enhance our own defensive capabilities as well as invest on the offensive side as we will never firewall our way out of the problem. initiative resides with the attacker. >> is it a money issue? is it an investment of money issue in the infrastructure to combat this kind of crime? or is there something else that the united states sh
competitors to step up the game in order for mcdonald's to start missing here in the united states. what will mcdonald's force to be done? and will that be good from an investor standpoint? how much will they have to give up maybe in terms of margins in order to get those customers back, for instance? >> you know, i think it's a combination of being more aggressive on the dollar menu. they will give a little bit on the margin side and we have near term caution on that particular point. but i also think they have a pretty nice product pipeline shaping up for 2013, which gives us excitement, and it's one of the reasons why mcdonald's is one of our favorite medium term names in the space. we do have some caution based on more difficult comparisons that show up in the fourth quarter as well as the threat of higher food costs that are going to pay out early next year. >> we should point out that with 104th on the price target. jim, we hear again from r.j. about food costs. actually the flip side of this is that we have a very weak labor market in the united states. so for as long as we're not
the united states does not talk about trickle-up economics, take that 80%, educate them, make them pay taxes, and stop charging the top 5% more and more for what they create. why is that conversation not happening here? >> well, that's part of why inet, the institute for new economic thinking, was founded. james heckman at university of chicago and nobel prize-winning economist and i are working on a major program. we have 179 people worldwide on early-age human capital, early-age education which includes public health. >> you just have to put more resources into the education system to make it work. >> and better allocation of incentives, absolutely right. you're talking about a national tragedy. >> the word "resources" is loaded especially this week when we've got chicago teachers facing a potential injunction. >> yes. >> overturning citizens united, right, is not going to -- is not going to pacify what's happening outside. >> mm-hmm. >> neither is paying teachers more or giving them a shorter school year. right? >> i think if you paid teachers more, say relative to other professions, you
30 times before it runs out of room to ignite that economy. unlike europe and the united states, the policy makers in china have plenty of room to maneuver, and that fact seems to be endlessly forgotten by the bears who point this out daily. sure, many of their banks are bankrupt. i'm not saying that i don't trust -- hey, they built a ton of bridges and tunnels to nowhere, but never underestimate the problem-solving power of cash on the balance sheet. and china's got cash up the yazoo if not the yangtze for good measure. then there is the united states. here we have the fiscal cliff. the fiscal cliff is something we have moderate control over because it's a question of political will. it can be resolved. anything that can be resolved will be dealt with in some fashion. and i think that's why the stock market has been climbing despite the obvious chasm ahead of us. sure, there are other reasons that could cause the selloff stocks. stocks have had a big run. valuations getting stretched if we have little growth ahead of us. twice in the last month federal express, man, they disapp
here in the united states? we've got similar issues, don't we? we have an e more nor we? we have an e more nomous debt l and the debate on what to cut. >> there's always a question of priorities and where you focus your attention. i think the president has made a major effort to reduce the budget deficit and also to invest in the future of the country, just like a corporation in many senses that has too much debt, that it has to put its debt in line with its ability to raise revenues. it also has to invest in its future. the president, i think, is investing in education, infrastructure, many things that will make the country stronger. that's really the goal. it's to have a sound budget policy but also invest in the country's future. i think that's what the president's trying to do. >> but bob, we haven't had a budget in three years. >> well, a lot of programs that he's proposed have not gotten through the congress. that's a big challenge. he's focused on education. he has a very significant proposal on infrastructure development. these are the kind of things that are needed to make us
plants in the united states and two of the most efficient coal-fire powered plants in the united states. we are now beginning to see both customers and shareholders the benefit of that building program. liz: now we're looking at a ten-year chart and it is a beautiful chart with the one tiny dip in 09 which everybody seemed to see. and again, since we're a business show where people are always looking for a great trade or a great stock to buy, this is something about you guys you know, you figure out ways to constantly move with what the atmosphere is doing, and that's why you are going to convert one of your plants at a pretty significant cost, from coal, you are going to convert one, i would assume you did the math and figure out it is best for business to do it this way? >> exactly, this particular power plant that we're about to convert is near downtown milwaukee which is where our headquarters building is. it is the only operating power plant inside the city limits of milwaukee. so it is a crucial piece of energy infrastructure to keep the lights on and keep voltage support for the
: all electric. i can understand the resistance in the united states. if we're talking about other countries, fair enough. and that's been its niche market. charles: it is a niche market but big enough market for an individual company like tesla where if you are trying to ram them down everybody's throats ala the volt. i think anybody who buys the roadster isn't going to be worried about the distance on the charge, the cost. when you have 100 grand to blow on a car, those are things that you aren't really --. i think the stock goes to 38. cheryl: thank you very much, charles. we will see you next hour. it is quarter past the hour right now. stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole: this stock is doing really well today, take a look at the shares are faring right now. tivo has come to an agreement with verizon. it said that verizon actually agreed to pay over 250 million dollars to settle pending patent litigation over video services. considered great news for tivo, up about 5% today. let's take a look at major market averages right now. the dow jones industrial average down 25 point
countries like the united states are already past the 50% penetration market. you got the smart phone. the incremental advantage of a new one, you know, is much less than the advantage for the future phone to a smart phone. >> people always trade up. you don't have total saturation. if you have one, you expect to get the new model, you drop it, you break it, it's note like you're not going to get another one. the expectations, the growth is exploding. 50 million iphones sold in the december quarter; right? that's the base bar. you know, that's the expectation. apple needs to beat that hurdle to keep forward momentum. when you only sold 150 million total units in the june quarter alone, worldwide among all the vendors, a third of the marketplace, is it poll? of course it is, but can they make them fast enough? that's the issue. >> is there backlash setting in for apple? i was watching tv in the samsung galaxy commercial makes fun of the people waiting in line for the iphone5. everywhere you go, you see the galaxy posters, point your phone up, and you get five free songs. there's fierce
speech he would say the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we sing our national anthem, which was quickly disproved by just looking on youtube. people around the world going like this and singing their national anthem. he dropped at the very next day. he never said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that is an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely and in small increments. >> i think the other thing we were talking about before the panel with brendan, the other thing we do not know, how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making ads, with speechwriters, they are talking about wording. how often are they saying, if we say that, the fact checkers will get us? i suspect that is happening a lot. the only evidence i have of that is a column written by connie schultz, who is married to sherrod brown, who says that happens in the brown campaign. i suspect that is happening in many campaigns. there is so much fact checking going on, not just with our
to contribute here in the united states." shements the europeans to do the -- she wants the europeans to do the unified banking supervision, unified fiscal policy, and shements the fiscal -- she wants the fiscal cliff addressed here in the united states. liz: ifo -- i-f-o, the german sentiment. people put emphasis into that. the recent health care law will hit the economy if not repealed. who did the survey? >> it's a really important survey, done by the national association of business economics, top economists at the country's biggest companies at places like dupont or wells fargo. the majority, 75% says health korsts continue to rise, and 60% say fewer employers provide coverage in the near future, and four out of the ten was the repeal of the health care law. the majority, nine out of ten said what is hanging up the u.s. economy is dc fiscal policy. the majority said make permanent the income tax rate, capital gains rate, and dividends rate, and and -- seven out of ten approved the pipeline. liz: how does the country run when nobody wants to do anything? who knows. apple. this is a huge
the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. there's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ for the spender who needs a little help saving. for adding "& sons." for the dreamer, planning an early escape. for the mother of the bride. for whoever you are, for whatever you're trying to achieve, pnc has technology, guidance, and over 150 years of experience to help you get there. ♪ >>> "squawk box" keeping our eyes on the prize, its eight a "squawk" oil summit. the smartest minds in the industry. >>> safeguarding your online reputation. the founde
of the market. it is in the hands of the eflt cb not the hands of united states. >> we should point out tomorrow we will get some sort of plan or are expecting to from the ecb perhaps some details about a bond buying plan of some kind that we're hearing some things about today. the market may be disappointed in that these reports seem to indicate they'd be targeting three years and less in terms of maturity. that they would not have a yield target perhaps, say we're not going to let it go above 7%, and that it would be sterilized purchases. there are some who believe, hey, you need to actually increase the money supply. really if you're going to get things moving in europe but of course the germans are always concerned about inflation and sterilization which basically means they'll try and take in as much in deposits as they buy in bonds. sort of keeping -- >> somebody tweeted this morning fed bernanke needs to show them how you really print money. and, jim, one other facet of this report is that the head of the bach the german still remains the one lone hold out to this bond buying policy meani
aren't moving anywhere. it's on hope they can get it rationalized. united states is on fire and everyone keeps saying why can't we buy ford. because of latin america and europe. >> facebook, a bit backward looking, but the best day yesterday since that ipo. it's almost you can't say ipo without saying botched ipo. that's the way everybody says it. was there a turn yesterday? >> i think that you're going to have a well p like situation is what people hope. yelp was a giant lock up that expired and all the shorts were piled on. it went up seven. you have to bet that everyone is overly short facebook to get this thing going. i think it's more of the dynamics of the lock up in actual earnings. >> the big lock up is coming november and by november, we'll have more than a million shares hit the market. >> that's a big lock up to overcome. >> aig was remarkable. had 600 million shares hit, but aig of course was valued at half book. facebook, not valued at half book. >> taking a look at the financials, it is worth noting because xlf closed at five-month highs. taking a bit of a brea
tax rate. the united states have highest corporate tax rate in the industrialized world making us less competitive. we need to bring down the corporate tax rate to attract investors and different corporations as well. we have to simplify the corporate tax code. a lot of extra provisions that can be reduced to simplify and make corporate taxes and individual taxes easier. reducing the rate and simplifying the deductions is the key winning formula. dennis: as soon as we hear reduce the rate that will make some americans feel they are favoring corporations. do you guys want overall corporate tax revenue to go up to help balance the budget? >> corporations have a role to play in the economy and they should play commensurate with their earnings like everybody should pay in terms of how we are structured. in terms of lowering the corporate tax rate increases jobs and that helps americans. by lowering the corporate tax rate you help the economy and individual americans and that is the key to getting the economy started again. dennis: overall should there be an alternative minimum tax so every
with the european debt crisis, and even within the united states, with it being an election year. >> reporter: but burberry says it has been talking to other luxury goods makers, so it knows it's not alone in seeing the slowdown. as a result, luxury good stocks like lvmh, tiffany, and coach also fell today, although they didn't get hit nearly as hard as burberry. it's not just luxury firms getting hurt by the global slowdown. many other bellwether firms have said revenues are suffering due to weaker sales in china, europe and elsewhere. in the s&p 500, there have been 88 negative pre-announcements for the third quarter so far, and only 20 positive ones. >> the number of negative pre- announcements we've received is the worst in over a decade. we've already seen analysts become very bearish on these companies. >> reporter: last week, chipmaker intel drastically reduced its sales forecast, warning consumers and businesses are buying fewer personal computers. the company also withdrew its full-year guidance, which is seen as a sign of extreme uncertainty. and fedex recently cut its earnings fore
tarp was one of the worst economic decisions in the history of the united states. >> okay. so like i said, he does not hold back on anything he's thinking about. he will be our guest host for two hours today, and that begins at 7:00 eastern. we are also going to be talking finance with the ceo of cowen and company, jeffrey solomon, and bill isaac. plus the state of innovation, steve case will be joining us live at 7:30 eastern time. so we have a big show ahead. before we get to all of that, let's get you up to speed on the morning's headlines. andrew, good morning. >> thanks, becky. good morning to you. we will get you caught up on some of the big headlines. germany's highest court ruling that the country can ratify the new permanent european bailout fund, but there are conditions to germany's participation. here's the important part. parliament will have veto power over any future increases. we'll have more on that story in just a few moments. back here in the u.s., the fed is beginning to begin convening a two-day policy setting meeting in washington. market expectations high. many
in france, germany, the uk and the bae largest customer, the united states. so where do we go from here? katherine boyle joins us, she's been writing about this online. a very good morning to you. let's talk about the impediments to something getting done. which is the biggest one in your opinion? >> well, i don't think you're going to see much political interference actually because i've heard from sources that in fact the main government evolved in the european side have all been consulted off the record and have given the nod. of course that didn't mean that there aren't other governments that could cause some trouble. as you mentioned, be have boeing, but we also have lockheed martin and northrup who are even bigger players in the defense market. >> and it raises the question is it a bigger deal for civilian air space market or defense. and obviously it's defense. >> the u.s. defense market which is still the world's biggest by several multiples. and why there's been a lot of noise about saudi arabia and china and other countries which are sort of bunch onin burgeoni. >> they need t
threats from the united states. >>> back here at home, a new mosque will be built in santa clara county. county approval has been given to build the cordova center. the approval process has been controversial. look at this. although many support it, others say the plan to build a cemetery at that site could contaminate ground water. county supervisors say the center has passed every requirement. >>> beginning march 1st, rvs will be banned from parking overnight in parts of san francisco. yesterday, the board of supervisors passed the ban on the vehicles, saying it was to help people get out of rvs and into temporary housing. but homeless advocates say this could force more people onto the streets. a complete list approved will be banned by the tsa and will likely include parts of the sunset and bayview district. >>> tesla's score says he's working on a -- tesla's ceo says he's working on a rail, a people-moving tube that he calls a hyperloop. he says it would cost $6 billion and tickets bo -- tickets would be cheaper than airfare. >>> time now, 7:05. sal is gonna take us to a ride at th
. >> in the sense that china is slowing down, europe is a mess, a lot of foreign capital coming to the united states, whether it's real estate. equities, treasuries, and worst still the united states, the bad lot. people are going to maintain them and we're outperforming and many versus india and russia and the money is slowing out of the u.s. and you see the money coming here. so far so good. and the scenario is right about bernanke being proactive and the money keeps coming. >> every time you come to the program, a great guest for us to have and we appreciate that. you said, look, go for the big name, international companies, are you still there? >> still there because we like the global footprint and the core competencies and the global brand. it takes decades, good management and core competence to build that out. and apple, ge, ibm, not recommending those, they're good global brands around for 50, 100 years, and they're going to be around for another hundred years. >> joe, good stuff. we appreciate it, thank you so much. sir. time for the gold report. almost at 950 eastern. where are we now? lo
there and are you independent of what happens in the united states as a bank? >> yes, we are focused on the market. even though we have a bank operation, and asset management business, too. and insurance, too. retail banking is the most important at the moment. >> your parent company, santander, still owns 75% of you. it's a bank that needs money, that's why you're going through the ipo. how do i know as an investor that santander won't flood the market with further stock going down the line? >> well, santander has a strategy, a list of different banks in the local markets. to have more community with the markets. and even though we have that company, santander is doing great in retail banking. decisions that are better for the mexican market. >> can you prevent them from selling the other 75% of your bank on the market? >> yeah, they have decided to sell a part because mexico is a very good investment for the group and is one of the main sources of profit and is good for the group. >> before we let you go, mexico's been through many, many debt crises. what is their view of how europe is handling
manufacturing contracting here in the united states. yesterday, we learned it's contracting in the china for the first time since november and in europe, it continues to contract. and yet, you think that the market is well supported here, why? >> i think it's going to be a range bound market. i think right now, we're in the tougher end of the range. there are two things that are supporting the market. one, there is an economic value to entities and so the lbo or acquisition value is providing support. to the extent companies return cash to shareholders, that offers some support. >> do you see many acquisitions in the market at the moment? >> no, and that's one of the things that's been surprising and disappointing at the same time. it's interesting. there are areas of the market where you've seen capital flow to economic opportunity. for example, buying single family homes to rent them out. which is an arbitrage that was made available by the decline housing prices you haven't seen a comparable level of activity on the corporate side, which is surprising. there are a couple of opportunit
in lebanon or destroi a cool in tune this -- he does not think that the united states can live with the nuclear armed iran. carl, one point to think about as we think about the president's remarks here, he's been under fire f, and the obam camp is making an important issue, obama is clearly walking a tightrope today and doesn't want to threat up his re-election chances. a very dell rat moment politically. >> not to mention anyone trying to drive in midtown manhattan. let's goat to headquarters with the market flash. >>> shares of carnival are higher 3.5%. what we heard from them, better than that, at the same time, you'll see this tempered stock and this stock is trading higher. >>> still ahead, marissa meyer announces her grand plan. >>> and "squawk on the street" will be live with both organizations. we don't call this our company, we call this our mission. green toys teaches children that if i have a milk jug and i stick it in the recycling bin it can turn into something new. chase allows us to buy capital equipment to be able to manufacture in the states to the scale we nee
a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. it's got that sweet honey taste. but no way it's 80 calories, right? no way, right? lady, i just drive the truck. right, there's no way right, right? have a nice day. [ male announcer ] 80 delicious calories. fiber one. >>> a cnn exclusive. what chris stevens knew about threats to his life before the attack that killed him. >>> 14 officials singled out in the fast and furious report but no blame for the attorney general. >>> mitt romney now talking about the 100% as he tries to court latino voters. >>> welcome back to "early start," everyone. >> very happy that you're with us this morning. we're going to begin this morning with new details in the attack on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. u.s. officials saying it was a case of terrorism. that attack killed four americ
of years here in the united states, no matter who's in charge. others think we're headed well down from here. how do you see it? how are you kind of playing this out? >> i really see that the u.s. has one of the most dynamic economies. a lot of entrepreneurs that can always figure out where else to take their companies. and i think this is -- we have seen that in shell gas, where shell gas went from nowhere to 50, 60, now 80 billion cubic meters of annual production. it's unbelievable. and i think this is something that, you know, we do believe in the u.s. economy in the fact that, you know, u.s. cooperations will always come up with new ways of satisfying that demand. >> andrei, thank you. >> thank you. >>> coming up, the jobs report could become a political football on the campaign trail. new england patriot president jonathan kraft will join us with a unique indicator. first, what happens when you send a conservative free market economist to the dnc with a microphone? peter shift found out and he'll join us live at 6:50 a.m. here's a little preview of that. >> how about a cap on prof
. that has more tweets than when the president of the united states came out in support of gay marriage which is one of the biggest hot topics of the past decade. it has more tweets than when beyonce, like the legendary beyonce, made her first tweet and even more tweets than when nasa tweeted out that we landed on the planet mars. >> wow. >> it's totally insane and going to be when we look back at the end of the year at one of the stories, that we're going to be like, wow, this was the story. >> a million tweets about it that night on "monday night football." >> it's insane. >> our last category is the it list, a couple of viral items. first up, this father. showing the pictures a little bit this morning. >> love this dad. this dad is so awesome. so, you know, we've been talking about more serious stuff and serious problems. the internet, it's all about the emotional connection you have with something, and these photos. how can you not like look at the photos and say this is so cute. like the pancakes this. dad is totally awesome. the cool thing about this is this is actually becoming a trend
contributor. david foon is part of the fastest growing jewish newspaper in the united states. gentlemen, how big of a factor is this tension between iran and israel factored into the price of oil? >> there's no question that today's run-up, marimaria, was direct reaction. we got a leak of some of the speech earlier before the market opened that, in fact, prime minister netanyahu was going to state what this red line was going to be all about. now we know. of course, it comes on the heels of ahmadinejad's speech yesterday. this got right back in the forefront of the traders and the markets' mind here. what it represents, of course, for oil is, you know, the mother of all supply risks here. the strait of hormuz comes into play. the whole region comes into play. obviously, it's almost a mild reaction given what we got here today. we're clearly on a path to something, some confully grags. i do say given that netanyahu says they won't get to that final stage until next summer, we have some time. >> david, what did you think of the red line speech? netanyahu has pressed for this before. the u.s. i
% of the budget. >>> back in the united states, the new york attorney general is investigating whether private equity firms have abused tax strategy in order to cut hundreds of millions from their tax bills. eric schneiderman wants documents that reveal whether they converted certain fgt fees into investments which are taxed at a lower rate than ordinary xhk. economy. schneiderman is looking to see if he's trying to embarrass bain. andrew, right now, i'll send it over to you. >> fascinating story. hope we talk about that in a little bit. corporate headlines this morning. valiant pharmaceuticals is buying metacis for $24 a share. a 39% premium. the deal boosting valiant skin care offering and adds botox to it's portfolio. oracle is launching an appeal on five-year long court case against s.a.p. last month they agreed to pay oracle $306 million over copyright infringement allegations. great to be back. what do you think, a little right here in. >> i've never heard of disport? >> botox? >> you're not who i'm worried about. it's clear by saying you might need it, i know what you're actually saying
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